John KINSMAN Ann KINSMAN Andrew KINSMAN John KINSMAN George KINSMAN Ann TILEY Joanna GUYSE John KINSMAN Mary KINSMAN George KINSMAN Ann KINSMAN Peter KINSMAN Jane KINSMAN Jane KINSMAN Mary WALLIS Mini tree diagram
1724 Andrew Kinsman 1772 portrait

1724 Andrew Kinsman 1772 portrait

Andrew KINSMAN

Nov 17241 - 28th Feb 17931

Grocer

Life History

Nov 1724

Born in Tavistock, Devon.1

11th Nov 1724

Baptised in Tavistock, Devon

s/o John

1745

Married Ann TILEY.1

1748

Birth of daughter Ann KINSMAN in Plymouth, Devon

1750

Birth of son John KINSMAN in Plymouth, Devon

1750

Birth of son Andrew KINSMAN in Plymouth, Devon

between 1750 and 1793

Occupation Congregational Minister at the Tabernacle, Princes Street, Devonport.1

1754

Birth of son George KINSMAN in Plymouth, Devon

1754

Death of son John KINSMAN in Tavistock, Devon

1757

Death of son George KINSMAN in Plymouth, Devon

Aug 1763

Ordained.1

(Honourary)

Jul 1774

Death of Ann TILEY in Plymouth, Devon.1

18th Oct 1776

St Luke, Old Street

18th Oct 1776

Married Joanna GUYSE in Finsbury, Middlesex.1,3,4

Andrew Kinsman of the parish of St Luke, Widower, and Joanna Webber of the same parish, widow, were married by Licence this eighteenth day of October 1776.

Gentlemans Magazine reported (1776) that Andrew Kinsman married Miss Webber, grand-daughter of the late Reverend Dr Guyse, on the 18th October.

30th Dec 1790

Wrote will in Stoke Damerel, Devon.2

14th Feb 1793

Codicil in Stoke Damerel, Devon.2

28th Feb 1793

Died in Plymouth, Devon.1

11th Sep 1793

Probate in London.2

Other facts

 

Occupation Grocer

Notes

  • Andrew married into some wealth from his wife Ann. Ann Tiley was already a Whitefield follower and she owned the ground on which the Tabernacle was built. Andrew was within a year an influencial lay member of the society and within 4 years regularly preaching. When George Whitefield came to town he then stayed with the Kinsmans.

    Other clergy came and went so that there was no one but Andrew to become ordained and take pastoral charge in 1763. From 1771 he allowed Andrew junior to run the grocer business and was a full time minster, but he soon had a number of assistants. They didn't seem to stay long.

    In time Andrew failed to register the deeds of the tabernacle with the Chancery so the ownership passed to Andrew junior by default on his death.

    [http://www.mun.ca/rels/cong/texts/journ2_new.html]

  • Calvinistic Methodism was the first to be established in Plymouth.  A Mr Andrew Kinsman of Tavistock had been converted after reading one of Whitefield's sermons.  He moved to Plymouth, where he set up business as a grocer, and founded the Tabernacle at Breton Side in the garden at the rear of his house.  Whitefield visited the Tabernacle in about 1744 when he passed through Plymouth on his way to America.

    Wesleyan Methodism was established in Plymouth in 1745, a year before John Wesley paid his first visit to the Town.   Members met in private houses and there was a great deal of open-air preaching, some of which brought about open hostility.  There were occasional meetings in the Moravian Chapel at Dock and in the old Tabernacle in Plymouth.

    In 1750 Kinsman became a regular minister locally and the following year moved to Plymouth Dock, where he found a private house in Queen Street in which he preached to 16 followers.  Then in 1752 he built a meeting-house in Granby Street on the site later occupied by the Classical and Mathematical School and after that by the Granby Cellars.  This became known as the Higher Room while the older premises became the Lower Room.  As the congregation expanded so the Higher Room was enlarged until in 1801 the Princes Street Chapel was erected on the site that George Whitefield had used for his first open-air meeting in Dock.

    It should be mentioned that the old Tabernacle remained Kinsman's property until his death, when he left it in trust for the purpose of perpetuating the gospel.  This bequest was annulled by the Mortmain Act and Kinsman's son became the owner.  He fell out with the minister, however, who wanted to get married while Kinsman junior preferred him not to.  He thus padlocked the door and planted himself in a house opposite with loaded pistols ready to shoot anyone who came near his property.  The ousted congregation met in the Baptist Chapel and then on December 8th 1797 opened the Norley Chapel, which was also known as the New Tabernacle.

    [Encyclopaedia of Plymouth History: Methodist Chapels]

  • With the exception of the Baptist chapel, the oldest of Plymouth's such places was the Batter Street Congregational Chapel, erected in 1704.  Forty years later Mr Andrew Kinsman, the son of a grocer at Tavistock, set up business in Breton Side, Plymouth, and formed a small congregation.  He built the Tabernacle in the back garden of his shop.

    [Encyclopaedia of Plymouth History: Congregational Chapels]

  • The Rev. Andrew Kinsman, was a pillar of Methodism in Plymouth. He had married Ann Tiley, who gave a site to the Methodists for a tabernacle for a Calvinistic Methodist society. Andrew Kinsman welcomed Howell Harris and George Whitefield to Plymouth. He himself was a popular preacher at the Tabernacle in London. After his death an appeal for funds was suppported by Christopher and Herbert Mends. The doctrinal standard of the new tabernacle was that of the Westminster Confession.

    [C.E.Welch, Andrew Kinsman's churches at Plymouth, The Devonshire Association, XCVII, 1965, 212-235; Evangelical Magazine 1793 45-59.]

    [http://www.plymouthdata.info/Churches-Methodist.htm]


Sources

Page created using GEDmill 1.11.0