Matthew KINSMAN Matthew KINSMAN Eliza Jane KINSMAN Maria KINSMAN John KINSMAN Elizabeth Ann MATTHEWS Elizabeth KINSMAN Mary KINSMAN Eliza THOMAS Mini tree diagram

James KINSMAN

18471 - 1881

Attendant at Sunnyside Lunatic Asylum

Life History

1847

Born in Gwennap, Cornwall.1

5th Jan 1851

Baptised in St Day, Cornwall.2

s/o Matthew and Eliza, mason of St Day

30th Mar 1851

Recorded in census in Gwennap, Cornwall (Gorland).1

between 1861 and 1871

Occupation Mason.3,4

1861

Resident in Bickington Row, St Day.3

4th Sep 1865

Administrator in Bodmin, Cornwall.5

Of the estate of his brother, John, who died in Mexico

1871

Resident in North Street, St Day.4

27th Aug 1871

Publication of banns of marriage to Elizabeth Ann MATTHEWS in St Day, Cornwall.2

Banns were read for James Kinsman, bachelor otp, and Elizabeth Ann Matthews, spinster otp, on 27 August and 3/10 September

14th Sep 1871

Married Elizabeth Ann MATTHEWS in St Day, Cornwall

From B Blake 2002

My Grandmother was born in Christchurch in 1877, her mother was 20 years old Emily MATTHEWS who was born in St Day. My Grandmother who's given name was Louie, was raised by her aunt & uncle, James KINSMAN and Elizabeth Ann KINSMAN nee MATTHEWS. The Kinsmans were married in 'The Parish Church' at St Day on 14-9-1871, they were both aged 23.

1872

Emigrated from ,Cornwall.6

aged 24, farm labourer, travelling with Elizabeth A Kinsman

1878

Occupation Attendant at Sunnyside Lunatic Asylum

1878

Resident in Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

1881

Died in Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Notes

  • From the Christchurch Star, 26 Apr 1878, reporting the inquest into the death of James' brother, Matthew:

    James Kinsman, who was duly cautioned before he gave evidence, said:

    "I am a warder in the Asylum, and brother of the deceased. I was driving the Asylum vehicle on the evening of April 23. We had been to the races. We returned by Riccarton Road, and turned up Frost's lane, and returned again on to the Riccarton Road. Just as we came out of the lane on to the Riccarton Road I had to keep on to the right hand side a little - the coach coming behind. This was my wrong side, but there was not room for me to go down the other because there was so many traps coming down. There was one coming behind me, and those who were with me sang out for me to hold it.

    I pulled to the left as far as I could. I saw the horses of the trap behind coming past me, and I had to see that I did not run into something on the other side. I was trying to straighten my horses in the road, and the horses of the coach were pulling past me then. The driver had to pull his horses on to the path.

    My brother was walking along the path. I sang out to him to look out for those horses. He turned his head around, and the swingletree of the front horse caught him and knocked him down. After the coach had passed I saw him lying on the road.

    I had a drink or two that evening, but nothing out of the way.

    I am in the habit of driving pretty often, two or three times a week, once a week, once a month.  I did not go square across the road.

    My brother was not sober at the time, he had been drinking a little.

    I cannot say how he was drawn in. I think if I had not callld to him he would not have been drawn in. He must have got confused."

Sources

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