Edward KINGMAN Joanna KINGMAN Anne KINGMAN Thomas KINGMAN John KINGMAN Bridget KINGMAN Henry KINGMAN Joanna Mini tree diagram
1595 Heny Kingman Monument

1595 Heny Kingman Monument

Henry KINGMAN

15951 - 5th Jun 16673

Ferryman2

Life History

1595

Born in ,,England.1

Calculated from age on emigration

1618

Birth of son Edward KINGMAN in ,,England.1

1624

Birth of daughter Joanna KINGMAN in ,,England.1

1626

Birth of daughter Anne KINGMAN in ,,England.1

1627

Birth of son Thomas KINGMAN in ,,England.1

1633

Birth of son John KINGMAN in ,,England.1

20th Mar 1633/4

Emigrated from Weymouth, Dorset, England.2,1

1634 (est.)

Birth of daughter Bridget KINGMAN in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts

3rd Mar 1635/6

Occupation Ferryman in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.2

Thomas Applegate was discharged of keeping the ferry at Waymothe, Henry Kingman licensed to keep the said ferry during the pleasure of the Court

1637 (est.)

Birth of son Henry KINGMAN in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts

12th Mar 1637/8

Occupation Ferryman in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.2

Henry Kingman, the ferryman of Weymoth, is granted for this year to take two pence apiece for transportation of people

11th Apr 1659

Death of Joanna in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.2,4,5

May 1660

Death of son Henry KINGMAN in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.2

before 1667

Death of daughter Anne KINGMAN

24th May 1667

Wrote will in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.2,3

5th Jun 1667

Died in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.3

31st Jul 1667

Probate in Weymouth, Norfolk, Massachusetts.3

By his son Thomas, his sons Edward and John having been deposed.

Other facts

 

Married Joanna

Notes

  • Name:   Henry Kingman
    Year:   1635
    Age:    40
    Estimated Birth Year:   abt 1595
    Place:  Massachusetts
    Family Members:         Wife Joane 39; Daughter Joane 11; Son Edward 16; Son John 2; Son Thomas 7; Daughter Anne 9

    (HOTTEN, JOHN CAMDEN, editor. The Original Lists of Persons of Quality; Emigrants; ...Who Went from Great Britain to the American Plantations, 1600-1700.)

  • 1636. He was listed as a landowner with 42 acres of land granted in the First Division in 1636 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.

    (George Walter Chamberlain Weymouth History, Vol 1, p199)

  • 1636. He took the Oath of Freeman at the General Court on 3 March 1635/36 at Weymouth, Massachusetts Bay Commonwealth, America.

    "I, Henry Kingman, being by God's providence an inhabitant and freeman within the jurisdiction of this common weale, do freely acknowledge myself to be subject to the government thereof, and therefore do hereby swear by the great and dreadful name of the ever-living God that I will be true and faithful to the same, and will accordingly yield assistance and support thereunto, with my person and estate, as in equity I am bound, and will also truly endeavor to maintain and preserve all the priviledges and liberties thereunto, submitting myself to the wholesome laws made and established by the same. And further, that I will not plot nor practise any evil against it, nor consent to any that shall be so done, but will timely discover and reveal the same to lawful authority now here established for the speedy preventing thereof. Moreover, I do solemnly bind myself in the sight of God that when I shall be called to give my voice touching any such matter of this State, wherein Freemen are to deal, I will give my vote and suffrage as I shall in my own conscience judge best to produce and tend to the public weale of the body, without respect of persons or respect of any man. So help me God in the Lord Jesus Christ."

    (MBC Freemen, online http://www.winthropsociety.org/freemen.htm)

  • The earliest method of travel seems to have been by boat. Dep. Gov. Symonds wrote to a friend in Boston, "let me know when you are to come that I may send horses to the boat." We can come, if we choose, with old Matthias Button or Henry Kinsman, who in 1634, the year Denison first pressed Ipswich soil, began to run occasional boats between Ipswich and Boston. They are the first Messengers of which we have record. Mary (Winthrop) Dudly, sister-in-law of the Denisons, who lived on Spring street, then called Brooke street, received by them some pinnes and sope, some flowered holland for a wast coat and tape to bind it, &c. With these Messengers let us float up the river."


    [Historical Sketch,  Ipswich,Mass. USA, 1633-1682
    Augustine Cornwell]




  • 1638. He was a Deputy representing Weymouth in 1638 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.

    (James Savage First Settlers of New England, Vol 3 - p27)

  • 1642. He acquired additional land, about 30 acres, from previous holders after 1642 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.

    (George Walter Chamberlain Weymouth History, Vol 1, p192)

  • 1652. He was a Deputy representing Weymouth in 1652 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.

    (James Savage First Settlers of New England, Vol 3 - p27)

  • 1663. He appeared on a list of property owners with 14 acres on 14 December 1663 at Weymouth, Massachusetts.

    (George Walter Chamberlain Weymouth History, Vol 1, p200)

  • 1666. Henry Kingman of Weymouth left a will on 24 May 1666 at Weymouth, Massachusetts; In his will he calls his age 74, or thereabouts.

    (James Savage First Settlers of New England, Vol 3 - p27)

Sources

  • 1. 1633 Passenger List
    • History of Weymouth, Vol 1, pp73&74
  • 2. The Isbell and Kingman Families
    • Owego Gazette Printing Office, 1899
  • 3. Will of Henry Kingman 1667
  • 4. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988
    • ancestry.com
  • 5. Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850
    • FindMyPast.com

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