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Henry Kingman of Weymouth Massachussetts

Originally of Somerset

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Data concerning Henry Kingman and his wife Joanna comes originally from a book published by Leroy W Kingman, one of his descendants, in 1899. Leroy was one of his many offspring who prosperred, he was at that time proprietor of the Owego Gazette. This has been added to from two further family histories, one written by Lewis Kingman in 1907, and a third (unfinished) written by Bradford Kingman and published posthumously in an incomplete form in 1912. Some further information has been gathered from other books including The History of Weymouth and The History of Bridgewater.

A big thank you to John Kingman and Peter Kingman for sharing their researches with me. Amalgamating and checking sources for the many trees published by Henry's descendants is still in progress and is far from complete. Many of these disagree with each other and very few of them draw on original sources. Many are copies of copies. There are two really significant documents pertaining directly to Henry, one is the record of his emigration, the other is his will. The first lists the names and ages of him, his wife and his children - notably three sons and two daughters. The second lists the same three sons as beneficiaries and executors, but also lists three daughters, but only by their married surnames.

So far no original source has been found to substantiate that his wife's maiden name was Drake as is commonly claimed. Similarly, there is no documentary evidence that either of them came from Frome, Somerset and the parish registers of that area do not support this hypothesis.

However, recent (March 2016) DNA evidence shows that Henry's line is the same as the line of George Kingman of Farrington Gurney, who is thought most likely to descend from the Frome Kingman family. So we at last have some hard evidence to support what most people believe.

Henry followed convention in his will by naming his sons in the order of their age. If he continued following this convention for his daughters, then his eldest daughter (Joanne) married a Holbrooke, his next (Anne) married a Davis, and his youngest, born after his emigration and said by most sources to be called Bridget, married a Barnard. The Holbrook and Barnard (Bernard) families came on the same ship as Henry in 1635. This idea has subsequently been disproven. From land transaction records it is apparent that it was Bridget who married Tobias Davis and not Anne.

The picture shown here is "Woman Grinding Corn" by Eduardo Kingman (1913-97), a descendant of this line and one of Ecuador's best known artists.

This tree is not the result of my own direct researches, it is my interpretation of work done by others. It is published here both as an independant record and also hopefully to attract interest from living Kingman descendants of this line. 

These pages currently contain records of 2,462 individuals. There are 126 cross referenced sources and 139 links to images.

Key Individuals:
Henry KINGMAN born in England in 1595. Emigrated to America in 1635 and settled in Weymouth, MA. He may have been from Somerset.
DNA comments:
We now have a yDNA marker for this family, which has proved a definite link to a line of Kingmans from Farrington Gurney in Somerset. We have a second yDNA sample in the lab waiting for results. More yDNA  donors would be great so that we could explore the pattern of changes, link that to the tree, and hopefully use that to date the connection to the Somerset line better. Any male Kingman descendant of this line in the USA would be most welcome and would help to explore this line further.

We also have a growing number of autosomal DNA results from Henry and Joanna's numerous descendants. This is proving to be an equally fascinating study due to the large number of related marriages among the early settlers of Massachusetts.

Section last updated 3rd July 2017











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