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Will of Mary BrowneJohn, widow, of Burghclere. 1637


This is the last Will and Testament of me Mary Brownejohn of Burghclere in the County of Southampton, relict of John Brownejohn of Burghclere aforesaid, late deceased, made, ensealed and subscribed with my hand the two and twentieth day of November in the 18th year of our sovereign Lord King Charles his reign of England Scotland France and Ireland, defender of the faith. 


And first I do bequeath my soul into the hands of Almighty God and my body to the Earth from whence it came, there to rest until the glorious return of my Lord and saviour Jesus Christ to judgement in hope then it both soul and body will be reunited and from thenceforth shall partake of the blessed inheritance prepared for them that love him and earnestly expect it his second coming. 


And as concerning that estate as God hath blessed me with all here on Earth I do dispose thereof as follows: 


First, to the church of Burghclere where I live I give 10 shillings and to the poor thereof I give 20 shillings, and to the poor of Newtown 20 shillings, and to the poor of Highclere 10 shillings. 


I give to my son Henry Brownejohn £20 to be paid within a year after my decease. 


To my sons William and John I give £20 apiece to be paid at their several ages of five and twenty years or sooner if it shall seem good to my executor that it be for their preferment, provided always that they be ruled by my executor and overseers of this my last Will and Testament, if otherwise they shall behave themselves then my will is that they shall only have five pounds apiece. 


To my daughter Sarah, I give £40 to be paid within a year after my decease. 


To my daughter Hunt I give £40 to be paid within two years after my death. 


And to my two youngest daughters Hester and Ann I give £50 apiece to be paid at their several ages of one and twenty. 


To my daughter Potinger I give £10 and to my goddaughter Mary Potinger five pounds with the purse that her mother made me. 


And to all the rest of my daughter Potinger’s is children 10 shillings apiece for a remembrance of my love to them. 


To my sons in law Richard Potinger and John Hunt, I give five pounds apiece and the same sum to Mr Robert Wise if he shall marry with my daughter Sarah. 


To John Potinger I give 10 shillings for his love shown to me and my children. 


All this to be paid within two years after my decease. 


And for my plate I dispose of it as follows: 


To my eldest son Richard Brownejohn I give my silver basin and ewer, two livery pots, and the little tankard, the great white salt, one Trencher salt, and one dozen of spoons. 


To my son Henry, I give my gilt bowl with a cover. 


To my son William my gilt beer bowl. 


To my son John my Colledge pot 


To my daughter Potinger my candle cup with the gilt spoon, six little silver boats with a white pot tipped with silver. 


To my daughter Sarah, one silver beer bowl, one porringer with a silver boat and spoon. 


To my daughter Hunt one other silver beer bowl and porringer and a Trencher salt. 


To my daughter Hester the great flat silver can and the little wine boule. 


To my daughter Ann one parcel gilt salt and one little wine boule. 


Item, I give to my daughter Hunt one featherbed and bolster with three blankets and one coverlet. 


To my three daughters unmarried I give to each of them one featherbed, one bolster with three blankets and coverlets or counterpanes as my executor shall think fit, but my will is my executor shall have two of the best with all appurtenances to them belonging before he doth dispose of the rest to my daughters, giving the first choice to the eldest and so downward to the youngest. 


To my daughter Potinger I give a suite of table linen as follows, one long flaxen tablecloth, one square cloth and one cupboard cloth, one long towel, with a dozen flaxen napkins 


To my daughter Sarah one suite of diaper cloth, a napkin tablecloth, a square cloth and a towel with a dozen of diaper, to her likewise a short flaxen tablecloth, one dozen of flaxen napkins, with a short towel. 


To my daughter Hunt a long flaxen tablecloth, one somewhat shorter, one square cloth, one cupboard cloth with two dozen of flaxen napkins and two towels. 


To my daughter Hester the best suite of damask, one long cloth, one square cloth, one cupboard cloth, two damask towels with two dozen of damask napkins, to her likewise one short flaxen tablecloth, a dozen of flaxen napkins and a short flaxen towel. 


To my daughter Ann one long flaxen tablecloth, one short flaxen tablecloth, a square cloth with two dozen of flaxen napkins, one cupboard cloth, and two short towels. 


All these linnens are in the chest in the blue chamber and in the cabinet in my chamber. And there is part likewise of as great a value left for my executor there and elsewhere, and there is a trunk in the studio that has two and twenty pair of sheets, whereof I give to my son John, two pair of them sheets, six shirts, one pair of pillow beers, six towels and five napkins which may serve when it shall please God he shall go and live at Oxford, and out of this same trunk I give the other 20 pair of sheets to be parted equally amongst my five daughters with a pair of pillow beers, a cupboard cloth, and one towel to each of my five daughters. 


To my son Henry his wife I give my silver wash basin. 


To my sister Butler my worst suit of apparel with my nightgown and my purse with 20 shillings in it. I also give her a pair of canvas sheets. 


I give to my two youngest daughters all my wearing apparel to be equally divided between them, except my frize gown and Stanwell petticoat with my old safegard and cloke which I do bequeath to Mary Coxhead my maid for her service with a quarters wages. 


My will is my daughter Hester shall have my best safeguard cloak and hood with my best furniture belonging to my horse. 


I give to my daughter Potinger my wedding ring. 


To my daughter Sarah my ring with four links to be set together 


To my daughter Hunt my enamel ring with a little small ring. 


To my daughter Hester my Diamond ring with my gold thimble. 


To my daughter Ann my little plain a ring with all the small things in the box. 


I give to my daughter Potinger my little cabinet in the closet. 


To my daughter Sarah the cabinet in the chamber over the kitchen 


To my son John and my daughters Hester and Ann one trunk apiece to be delivered to them by my executors. 


And further my will is that if any of my children do die before any legacy becomes due to any of them by this my last will that then the intended legacy shall wholy redound to the use of my executor. 


My will is that my executor shall allow Anthony Brownejohn my husbands brother, his victt during his life, according to the intent of my dear husband his will, and for his love to me I do bequeath unto him 10 shillings for a ring. 


I do give to my daughter Hunt two needlework cushions and to Mary Potinger my goddaughter my Bible. 


I give to my servant Morice Steptoe if he liveth with me at my decease 10 shillings, and to Nicholas Palmer if he liveth with me 10 shillings, and of the rest of my servants that have lived with me above a year, three shillings four pence apiece. 


I desire Master Doctor Lucy and my brother Robert Folwell to be overseers of this my last will and Testament as they stand overseers of the will of my late dear husband deceased 


I do give to Master Doctor Lucy 20 shillings as a token of my love to him. 


To my brother Robert Folwell I give six pound thirteen shillings and four pence for his pains and love, which he has shown both to me and my children. 


Lastly all my goods and chattels both within doors and without unbequeathed I give to my eldest son Richard Brownejohn whom I make executor of this my last Will and Testament desiring him to be an aid to all his brothers and sisters and to encourage them in all virtuous and religious causes. 


And my last legacy of my love to all my children is that they live in the fear of God in unity and peace one with the other, and in love with their neighbours; remembering that they are but stewards and must with me give up their account to which audit I am now going. 


God I desire that you forgive me and I forgive the world. God bless you all my children and I pray God send us a joyful meeting in heaven where will be no separation. 


Mary Brownejohn 


Witnesses hereunto, 


Robert Folwell 


John Hunt 


Probate in London on the last day of January in the year of our Lord 1638 by Richard Brownejohn, son and executor named in the will.








Last updated 13 May 2014